Monthly Archives: September 2012

Black Bean, Zucchini and Olive Tacos

Black Bean Zucchini Olive Tacos

This is one of those vegetarian (and vegan) dishes you can easily adapt to what you have.  This time of year, it would be fun to use squash, or pumpkin chunks, or sweet potatoes in place of the zucchini.

You can use any bean, of course.  

The corn tortillas make it special.  Love the grain texture and taste.

Black Bean, Zucchini and Olive Tacos
Compliments of JennaDish

from Appetite for Reduction by Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

1
teaspoon olive oil
2 zucchini, diced small (about 1lb)
2 jalapenos, seeded and sliced thinly
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/3 cup pitted kalamata olive, chopped
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1 (6 ounce) can salsa verde (I used Frontero Tomatilla Sauce)
1 (16 ounce) can black beans, drained &
rinsed
8 (6 inch) corn tortillas
1/2 cup finely chopped scallion

Garlic-Lemon Yogurt
1 cup unsweetened plain soy yogurt (Wildwood
is suggested)
2 -3 garlic cloves
Zest from 1/2 lemon
Juice from 1 lemon (3 Tbsp)
1/2 teaspoon light agave nectar

Preheat a heavy bottomed skillet over
medium-high heat. Pour in the oil and add the zucchini and jalapeno, sprinkle
with the salt. Saute for about 7 minutes, or until the zucchini is lightly
browned.

Add the garlic, olives, cumin, and coriander,
and saute for 2 minutes more.

Add the salsa verde and black beans and cook
for 5 minutes. The salsa should reduce a bit so its not soupy.

Mix the ingredients for the Garlic-Lemon
Yogurt if you are using.

Warm the tortillas in a skillet or wrap in a
moist towel and microwave for one minute. Serve with Garlic-Lemon Yogurt and chopped scallions. 

 

Homemade Whole Wheat Pizza Crust

Whole Wheat All-Purpose Pizza Dough

You can make your own healthy, whole wheat pizza dough with a nice, crispy crust – all without any expensive equipment or fancy culinary skills.

Make this simple Martha Stewart dough with half whole wheat flour and half all-purpose white flour, and make 6" rounds for individual pizzas. 

6 inch individual pizza dough

Use whatever you need and freeze the rest in between sheets of parchment.  (Wax paper will stick to the dough.)

Frreeze Ahead Whole Wheat Pizza Dough
This is what the frozen round looks like out of the freezer.  It got a little thin in one spot.  This dough isn't as thick and sturdy as a store-bought pizza crust.  So after about 1 minute, this crust was flopping over.  So no need to let it thaw – you can take it out of the freezer, put your toppings on, and bake.

Crusty Bottom Pizza Dough Baked on a Ceramic Tile

To get a crust crispy and brown on the bottom and edges,  some people turn their oven up to 500o but I don't like to do that – it's just too hot and unnecessary.  To get my crust looking like this…

How to Get your Homemade Pizza Crust Crispy on the Bottom

I preheat my oven to 450o and use baking stones.  If you don't want to spend $30-$50 on a baking stone that's not big enough to hold more than one pizza (and sometimes cracks), use this cheap trick ….

Ceramic Tile Baking Stone

Go to a home improvement store like Home Depot, and purchase two 12"x12" ceramic tiles (floor tiles) for about $3 each, and they should fit perfectly, side by side, across your oven.  Once these stones are heated up, they will crisp your dough up nicely.

The best way that I've found to get fresh, sticky pizza dough in the oven, and a hot, slippery pizza out of the oven, is to place the dough on a piece of parchment paper.  No pizza peel needed.

Oh, and you save money and you save your family nasty, overly-processed ingredients from store bought pizza.


Whole Wheat Pizza Crust

Compliments of JennaDish

from Martha Stewart

MAKES TWO 1-POUND BALLS (about 6-8 six-inch pizza crusts) 

1 1/2 cups warm (115 degrees) water
2 packets (1/4 ounce each) active dry yeast
1/4 cup olive oil, plus more for bowl
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons coarse salt
2 cups all-purpose flour (spooned and leveled), plus more for
kneading

2 cups whole-wheat flour (spooned and leveled)

Place water in a large bowl; sprinkle with yeast. Let stand
until foamy, about 5 minutes. Brush another large bowl with oil.

In bowl with yeast, whisk sugar, oil, and salt. Stir in flours
with a wooden spoon until a sticky dough forms. Transfer to oiled bowl; brush
top of dough with oil. Cover bowl with plastic wrap; let stand in a warm spot
until dough has doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Turn dough out onto a well-floured surface. With floured hands,
knead until smooth, about 15 seconds; divide into two balls.

Set balls on a plate (they should not touch); freeze until firm,
about 1 hour. Then freeze in a freezer bag up to 3 months. Thaw overnight in
refrigerator.

Divide each ball of dough into 4 pieces. Using your hands,
stretch each piece into a 5-inch disk (if dough becomes too elastic to work
with, let it rest a few minutes).  Jenna's Note:  Spread a little semolina on your working surface, then push the edges of the dough out while constantly rotating it.  Don't flip the dough over which will work the semolina into the dough.  You want to keep the semolina on the bottom which helps it to not stick to your work surface.

 

How to Press Tofu Quickly

How to Press Tofu
Drain the liquid from the extra-firm tofu, gently squeeze more of the water out with your clean hands, wrap in a few layers of paper towel or better yet, an absorbent, lint-free kitchen towel (like a bar towel – no terry cloth).  Wrap that in plastic to keep things from getting wet.  Stack something heavy on top to press out the remaining moisture.  Do this for about 10-30 minutes – however much time you have.

You will have tofu that looks like this … easy to cut.

Pressed Tofu